Worldcon 2021 Schedule

I’ve been under deadlines for the last few weeks and I’m only just getting to this post now. I’m literally sitting in the hotel lobby as I write this. Which is to say I’ll be at Discon III (aka WorldCon 2021) this weekend! In person! I’m excited to see people in real life again.

Here’s my schedule:

Thursday, Dec 16th, 11:30 AM  –  Kaffeeklatsch with A. T. Greenblatt – Suite 325 Side Room              
Thursday, Dec 16th, 1:00 PM  – Signing – A.T. Greenblatt – Autograph 3  

Friday, Dec 17th, 7:00 PM – Panel –  Writing Short Fiction – Blue Room

Saturday, Dec 18th, 10:00 AM – Panel –  Story Structures Besides the Hero’s Journey – Older
Saturday, Dec 18th, 4:00 PM  –  Panel –  Why Do We Love Novellas and Novelettes? – Cabinet Room  
Saturday, Dec 18th, 8:00 PM –    Hugo Award Ceremonies!        

The Hugo will be streamed on Saturday night and I’ll update this post with the link when I have it.

In the meantime, please feel free to come say hello to me if you are at the convention. Apologies in advance – I’m terrible with faces in the best of times, so if I don’t recognize you, it’s not personal.
               

Bridge to Elsewhere Anthology Kickstarter

As I write this, it’s almost the weekend and I’m settling in for a few days of story revisions and writing related work. I have a handful of stories coming out in 2022 if all goes well – two that are finished and accepted, one that I’m revising this weekend, and one that is only a few opening sentences in my notebook. (That last one is a problem child.)

However, one of the two finished stories is going to be in the Bridge to Elsewhere anthology, edited by Julia Rios and Alana Joli Abbott, published by Outland Entertainment. The anthology is centered around space exploration and daring crews. My story “The Music of a New Path” is about an AI ship that changes course without warning, while the crew races to figure out why before it’s too late. It was fun to write!

The project is currently running a Kickstarter and the list of authors included for this project is amazing. Please consider supporting the anthology here.

That’s it for now. I’ll be posting my year end eligibility post at some point this weekend. Probably.

In any case, thanks for reading and I hope you are staying safe and happy wherever you are.

New Story: “Questions Asked In the Belly of The World” Published at Tor.com!

Dear S—-,

I need you to keep me honest. In the next story I write I’m not allowed to use my favorite props, i.e. body-less voices, ghosts, and characters whose lives revolve around making things. Bonus points if no one gets eaten.

In the meantime, I’ve created a monster.

This was an email I sent to my friends in November 2015 when I asked them to read a very early and very rough draft of this story. It was only a shadow of what this story would become, but I knew even then that there was something in it worth telling.

I’m very pleased to announce that that first draft became “Questions Asked in the Belly of the World” and it is now live and free to read over at Tor.com.

This is a story that took me five years to get right, partly because it was outside my skill level to tell until recently and partly because it took me a while to figure out what the story was actually about. It is one of the strangest stories I’ve ever written and one of my most ambitious ones to date.

My writing soundtrack to this story was “Arsonist’s Lullaby” by Hozier.

Hope you enjoy my monster!

Upcoming Live Readings in March

The nice thing about the pandemic is that I can have two readings in one week half a continent away from each other. The downside is I would love to be in both Toronto and Orlando right now. But either way, I’m excited for both of these events next week.

The first event is on March 17th, at 7pm for the Ephemera Reading series in Toronto. The theme is joy, which I think I can find a story for. I’ll be reading with Curtis Chen and Rebecca Hirsch Garcia. I’m thrilled to be a part of this reading series!

The second event is for the convention ICFA which is usually in Orlando every year, except this year it will be online. I’ll be reading with Richard Butner and Gregory Norman Bossert on March 20th, at 9 pm EST. I’ve always enjoyed reading at ICFA, so I’m looking forward to this event too.

Hope to *see* you there.

“RE: Bubble 476” Published in Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine

I’m excited to announce that my story “RE: Bubble 476” is now available to read in the March/April issue of Asimov’s Science Fiction Magazine. Unlike nearly all my fiction publications, I can’t provide a link to the story because it’s in print. Like arrived-in-my-mailbox in print. Like it’s a physical thing I can hold and I have the pictures to prove it!

Which means, if you’d like to read it, you’ll need a copy for yourself.

This is the first time I’ve had a story published in one of the Big Three (Analog, Asimov’s, Fantasy & Science Fiction), so that’s a good feeling. I’m not going to talk here about my process or the story behind the story because I did an author interview post on Asimov’s blog. (ETA: Interview is now live!)

The song I used as a soundtrack for this story was There is a House by The Holy.

As always, I wouldn’t be able to publish my stories in this fashion without magazines like Asimov’s. So, if you can, please consider buying this issue or a subscription. It helps us all continue to tell stories.

Year End Eligibility Post 2020

Oh man, what a year. It feels like it’s been both a month long and stretching out for centuries. Still, I can’t complain too much, I’ve been lucky. And I know I’ve said this every year for the last few years, but this has truly been an amazing year for my writing career. I got stories accepted by magazines that I’ve been trying to break into for a decade. I finished some very difficult pieces and did some tie-in writing for Magic the Gathering. Also, I won a Nebula!

So, yeah, no complaints.

I had two stories come out this year – a novelette and short story. I’d be thrilled if you checked them out. They both have audio versions too.

Burn or the Episodic Life of Sam Wells as a Super

  • Uncanny Magazine Issue 33, May/June 2020 -9,000 words.
  • Audio link

One Time, A Reluctant Traveler

  • Clarkesworld Magazine, Issue #166, July 2020 – 5,800 words
  • Audio link

That’s what I got this year! But I’m always looking for recommendations. What have you read this year that you’ve enjoyed?

My Schedule for IEEE and Capclave

Greeting all! I mentioned in my post last week that I will be attending two other online conventions this month. Here’s my schedule for both of them.

First up, IEEE. A one day cross over convention between electrical engineers and science fiction writers.

  • Panel: Does Science Fiction Influence Technical and Social Change? – Sat 10/10, 3pm EST
    • Panelists – Mary Turzillo, A. T. Greenblatt
  • Panel: Round Table Discussion with All Panelists – Sat 10/10 4pm EST

Second, Capclave, which is one of the local conventions I enjoy attending every year. Also, “Give the Family My Love” is a finalist for the Washington Science Fiction Small Press Award, which will be presented Saturday night. I’m so honored to be among such excellent finalists!

  • Panel: Ask Me Anything – Author Edition – Sat 10/17, 9:00 AM
    • Ask our panel of authors absolutely anything about what they do – writing, getting published, elevator pitches, getting an agent, dealing with writers block, writers workshop etc. Includes many non-writer-parts-of-being-a-writer, such as being your own boss, setting schedules, and so on.
    • A. T. Greenblatt (mod), Bjorn Hasseler, Ken Liu, Lawrence M. Schoen, Mary G. Thompson
  • Author Reading– Sat 10/17, 1:00 PM
  • Panel: Writing Time Travel and Paradoxes – Sat 10/17, 3:00 PM
    • Time travel stories date to the 19th century. How can you make your type of time travel unique, or have all the twists already been mined? How do writers keep everything (relatively) straight for the writer and readers, even while the characters are facing convolutions? How can you explain worldbuilding challenges, such as why time travellers don’t mob every historical event? Panelists will discuss what makes some time travel stories work and which ones do not.
    • A. T. Greenblatt, Ian Randal Strock, Iver P Cooper, James Morrow
  • Kaffeeklatsch with Cato, Colter & Greenblatt – Sat 10/17, 4:30 PM
    • Beth Cato (mod), A. T. Greenblatt, L. D. Colter
  • Panel: Intro to Short Fiction Markets – Sun 10/18, 3:00 PM
    • Where can writers go to sell their short fiction? How do new authors find out about markets? What new markets have opened up? Are there too many online sources that pay less than market rates? Are print magazines still dying or are they in recovery with new print publications opening up?
    • A. T. Greenblatt (mod), Karlo Yeager Rodriguez, Neil Clarke, Sarena Ulibarri, Scot Noel

That’s it for me for the month of October! As always, stay safe and healthy and Americans, please vote!

“One Time, A Reluctant Traveler” Out Now at Clarkesworld!

Hello all! I’m excited to announce that I have a new story out. It’s called “One Time, A Reluctant Traveler” published in Clarkesworld Magazine!

This is a story I wrote during the pandemic and consequently, it was a difficult story to write. Partly because global catastrophes tend to atrophy your creativity. Partly because it’s a story about depression and the cyclical and generational nature of it.

But it also includes things which I had so much fun writing, like a sarcastic park ranger robot and stories within stories. It’s been years since I’ve ridden a bike outside, but I had a great time reimagining what that would feel like in a strange landscape.

In terms of music, a weird thing has been happening to me lately. When I write, I usually find one or two songs that act as a soundtrack to the story, then I listen to them on repeat. That hasn’t been the case lately. Instead I’ve been listening to playlists or entire albums. But I think of all the songs I listened to while writing this, Jordan Klassen’s Virtuous Circle and Surprised/Not Surprised are the two songs I associate most with this piece.

As always, I hope you enjoy the story. And more importantly, I hope you are staying safe and healthy.

“Give the Family My Love” Wins a Nebula Award!

So, this happened. “Give The Family My Love” published in Clarkesworld Magazine won the Nebula award for Best Short Story last night. Honestly, I’m still completely stunned and I would love to say something profound here, but I’m really, really tired tonight.

So I figured I’ll transcribed my acceptance speech here instead

But before I do that, if you like to see the awards ceremony you can watch it in its entirety here. If you only want to see the short story category and my speech, skip to the 34:30 minute mark.

Here’s the speech:

Um, so, wow. This is a shock and surprise. Thank you all so, so much for this amazing honor. It is truly a dream come true. Writing is a lonely process, but nothing is created alone.

So, I’d like to thank Neil Clarke for taking a chance on this story and to Kate Baker for her amazing narration. Thank you to my fabulous critique group who saw a half finished draft of this story several years ago and understood what I was trying to do.

Thank you to all my friends, online and in-person, who have been my consistent support network. And thank you to my family who have always been supportive and encouraging through the ups and downs in my career. Who don’t mind that I disappear for hours on the weekends to write. I love you very much.

Finally, thank you to all the readers who believed in this story. These are truly terrifying times where tomorrow is not necessarily guaranteed. But being human means we’re complicated creatures with complicated emotions and opposable thumbs. Which means we can hold our fear and our dread in one hand and our hope in the other.

And I hope you hold tight to that hope, that desire to make good art and make the world a bit better, even when things look bleak.

Especially when things look bleak.

Thank you so much.

Here’s a list of all the winners.

Schedule for the 2020 Nebula Virtual Conference

I hope everyone is staying healthy and safe these last few months. I’m one of the lucky ones who is able to work from home. It’s both great and lonely and I’ve never been so grateful to have a dog. Tilly is making sure I’m getting up for walks a few times a day and going to bed a reasonable times because there’s no better alarm clock than an alarm clock dog.

Most of the conferences I was planning on going to this year have been cancelled. Fortunately, the Nebula Conference put on by Science Fiction Writers of America is going to be virtual the weekend. In addition to the awards ceremony on Saturday night (which will be streamed live and free to all), they have put together a wonderful list of panels.

I’ll be on two panels on Sunday:

Moving the Line: Advanced Imposter Syndrome – May 31, 2020 5:00 pm to 6:00 pm EST

Panelists:Mike Chen (He/Him), G. V. Anderson, K.M. Szpara, A. T. Greenblatt and Karen Osborne (moderator)

Authors discuss strategies to cope with their own Imposter Syndrome as their careers evolve and they branch out into new areas of writing.

Forming and Sustaining a Successful Writing or Critique Group – May 31, 2020 6:30 pm to 7:30 pm EST

Panelists:A. T. Greenblatt, A.C. Wise, Vylar Kaftan, Curtis C. Chen and Rebecca Gomez Farrell (moderator)

Panelists will discuss the factors that go into building a successful group, both online and in-person, and what they’ve learned about keeping one going.

I’ll be around at the con all weekend “hanging out.” If you’re going to be there too, please feel free to say hello to me.